The stress cascade and schizophrenia: etiology and onset.

@article{Corcoran2003TheSC,
  title={The stress cascade and schizophrenia: etiology and onset.},
  author={Cheryl M. Corcoran and Elaine F. Walker and Rebecca L. Huot and Vijay A. Mittal and Kevin D. Tessner and Lisa P. Kestler and Dolores Malaspina},
  journal={Schizophrenia bulletin},
  year={2003},
  volume={29 4},
  pages={
          671-92
        }
}
Psychosocial stress is included in most etiologic models of schizophrenia, frequently as a precipitating factor for psychosis in vulnerable individuals. Nonetheless, the stress-diathesis model has not been tested prospectively in prodromal patients as a predictor of psychosis. The biological effects of stress are mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which governs the release of steroids, including cortisol. The past few decades have witnessed an increased understanding of… 

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