The stone tools of capuchins (Cebus apella)

@article{Westergaard2007TheST,
  title={The stone tools of capuchins (Cebus apella)},
  author={Gregory Charles Westergaard and Stephen J. Suomi1},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2007},
  volume={16},
  pages={1017-1024}
}
We examined the production of stone took by capuchins (Cebus apella). Eleven subjects used five reduction techniques to produce 346 stone tools (48 cores and 298 flakes). They produced a sharp edge on 83% of the cores and largest flakes. Three monkeys later used a sample of these objects as cutting tools. These results demonstrate that monkeys produce lithic tools analogous to those produced by Oldowan hominids. 

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