The stem osteichthyan Andreolepis and the origin of tooth replacement

@article{Chen2016TheSO,
  title={The stem osteichthyan Andreolepis and the origin of tooth replacement},
  author={D. Chen and H. Blom and S. Sanchez and P. Tafforeau and P. Ahlberg},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={539},
  pages={237-241}
}
The teeth of gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) show rigidly patterned, unidirectional replacement that may or may not be associated with a shedding mechanism. These mechanisms, which are critical for the maintenance of the dentition, are incongruently distributed among extant gnathostomes. Although a permanent tooth-generating dental lamina is present in all chondrichthyans, many tetrapods and some teleosts, it is absent in the non-teleost actinopterygians. Tooth-shedding by basal hard tissue… Expand
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