The status of the kepler conjecture

@article{Hales1994TheSO,
  title={The status of the kepler conjecture},
  author={Thomas C. Hales},
  journal={The Mathematical Intelligencer},
  year={1994},
  volume={16},
  pages={47-58}
}
  • T. Hales
  • Published 1 June 1994
  • Physics
  • The Mathematical Intelligencer
Configuration spaces of equal spheres touching a given sphere: The twelve spheres problem
The problem of twelve spheres is to understand, as a function of \(r \in (0,r_{max}(12)]\), the configuration space of 12 non-overlapping equal spheres of radius r touching a central unit sphere. It
The Strong Thirteen Spheres Problem
TLDR
A computer-assisted proof is given based on an enumeration of irreducible graphs of 13 equal-size non-overlapping spheres touching the unit sphere of the thirteen spheres problem.
Historical Overview of the Kepler Conjecture
  • T. Hales
  • Physics
    Discret. Comput. Geom.
  • 2006
AbstractThis paper is the first in a series of six papers devoted to the proof of the Kepler conjecture, which asserts that no packing of congruent balls in three dimensions has density greater than
Kepler’s conjecture: How some of the greatest minds in history helped solve one of the oldest math problems in the world
If you pour unit spheres randomly into a large container, you will fill only some 55 to 60 percent of the space. If you shake the box while you are filling it, you will get a denser packing -
The Kissing Problem in Three Dimensions
  • O. Musin
  • Mathematics
    Discret. Comput. Geom.
  • 2006
TLDR
A new solution of the Newton--Gregory problem is presented that uses the extension of the Delsarte method and relies on basic calculus and simple spherical geometry.
Sphere Packings Ii Section 1. Introduction
An earlier paper describes a program to prove the Kepler conjecture on sphere packings. This paper carries out the second step of that program. A sphere packing leads to a decomposition of R 3 into
Sphere Packings, II
  • T. Hales
  • Mathematics
    Discret. Comput. Geom.
  • 1997
TLDR
The second step of a program to prove the Kepler conjecture on sphere packings leads to a decomposition of R3 into polyhedra, which has density at most that of a regular tetrahedron.
The kissing number in four dimensions
The kissing number problem asks for the maximal number k(n) of equal size nonoverlapping spheres in n-dimensional space that can touch another sphere of the same size. This problem in dimension three
A Rejoinder to Hales’s Article
ConclusionThis then is an item-by-item reality check on the mathematical content of their objections to my article [2], on which they have based their assessment on the status of the Kepler
2 1 A pr 2 00 5 THE KISSING NUMBER IN FOUR DIMENSIONS
The kissing number problem asks for the maximal number of equal size nonoverlapping spheres that can touch another sphere of the same size in n-dimensional space. This problem in dimension three was
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The second edition of this book continues to pursue the question: what is the most efficient way to pack a large number of equal spheres in n-dimensional Euclidean space? The authors also continue to
The Problem of the Thirteen Spheres
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An independent proof of this impossibility of David Gregory's conjecture that a sphere can touch thirteen non-overlapping spheres equal to it is outlined.
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The excavation of Vaenget Nord has yielded clues to the rich foraging culture that flourished on the coasts of northern Europe during the Mesolithic. Decapage was used for the reconstruction of the
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TLDR
Pythagoras combined within one person the attributes of a mystic, philosopher, and scientist, as one laying down the foundations of science, as well as influencing all European ethics not directly inherited from the East.
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