The status of dwarf carnivores on Cozumel Island, Mexico

@article{Cuarn2004TheSO,
  title={The status of dwarf carnivores on Cozumel Island, Mexico},
  author={Alfredo D. Cuar{\'o}n and Miguel Angel Mart{\'i}nez-Morales and Katherine W. Mcfadden and David Valenzuela and Matthew E. Gompper},
  journal={Biodiversity \& Conservation},
  year={2004},
  volume={13},
  pages={317-331}
}
Cozumel Island in the Mexican Caribbean is inhabited by four carnivores, of which two, the Cozumel coati Nasua nelsoni and pygmy raccoon Procyon pygmaeus, are endemic species. The taxonomic status of a third carnivore, a dwarf gray fox Urocyon cinereoargenteus, is undetermined, but may deserve subspecific or species-level recognition. The fourth species, the kinkajou (Potos flavus), may be a recent introduction. We review the status of these carnivores, report our field observations and results… 
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