The status of Homo heidelbergensis (Schoetensack 1908)

@article{Stringer2012TheSO,
  title={The status of Homo heidelbergensis (Schoetensack 1908)},
  author={Chris B Stringer},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2012},
  volume={21}
}
  • C. Stringer
  • Published 1 May 2012
  • Biology
  • Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues
The species Homo heidelbergensis is central to many discussions about recent human evolution. For some workers, it was the last common ancestor for the subsequent species Homo sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis; others regard it as only a European form, giving rise to the Neanderthals. Following the impact of recent genomic studies indicating hybridization between modern humans and both Neanderthals and “Denisovans”, the status of these as separate taxa is now under discussion. Accordingly… 
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