The spectral transmission of ocular media suggests ultraviolet sensitivity is widespread among mammals

@article{Douglas2014TheST,
  title={The spectral transmission of ocular media suggests ultraviolet sensitivity is widespread among mammals},
  author={Ronald H. Douglas and Glen Jeffery},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2014},
  volume={281}
}
  • R. Douglas, G. Jeffery
  • Published 7 April 2014
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Although ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity is widespread among animals it is considered rare in mammals, being restricted to the few species that have a visual pigment maximally sensitive (λmax) below 400 nm. However, even animals without such a pigment will be UV-sensitive if they have ocular media that transmit these wavelengths, as all visual pigments absorb significant amounts of UV if the energy level is sufficient. Although it is known that lenses of diurnal sciurid rodents, tree shrews and… Expand
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