The spatial and temporal signatures of word production components

@article{Indefrey2004TheSA,
  title={The spatial and temporal signatures of word production components},
  author={Peter Indefrey and Willem J. M. Levelt},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2004},
  volume={92},
  pages={101-144}
}

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