The soundscape of the Anthropocene ocean

@article{Duarte2021TheSO,
  title={The soundscape of the Anthropocene ocean},
  author={Carlos M. Duarte and Lucille Chapuis and Shaun P. Collin and Daniel P. Costa and Reny P. Devassy and V{\'i}ctor M. Egu{\'i}luz and Christine Erbe and Timothy A. C. Gordon and Benjamin S. Halpern and Harry R. Harding and Michelle-Nicole Havlik and Mark G. Meekan and Nathan D. Merchant and Jennifer L. Miksis-Olds and Miles Parsons and Milica Predragovic and Andrew N. Radford and Craig A. Radford and Stephen D. Simpson and Hans Slabbekoorn and E. Staaterman and Ilse C. Van Opzeeland and Jana Winderen and Xiangliang Zhang and Francis Juanes},
  journal={Science},
  year={2021},
  volume={371}
}
An anthropogenic cacophony Sound travels faster and farther in water than in air. Over evolutionary time, many marine organisms have come to rely on sound production, transmission, and reception for key aspects of their lives. These important behaviors are threatened by an increasing cacophony in the marine environment as human-produced sounds have become louder and more prevalent. Duarte et al. review the importance of biologically produced sounds and the ways in which anthropogenically… Expand
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