The sound of emotions—Towards a unifying neural network perspective of affective sound processing

@article{Frhholz2016TheSO,
  title={The sound of emotions—Towards a unifying neural network perspective of affective sound processing},
  author={Sascha Fr{\"u}hholz and Wiebke Trost and Sonja A. Kotz},
  journal={Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2016},
  volume={68},
  pages={96-110}
}
Affective sounds are an integral part of the natural and social environment that shape and influence behavior across a multitude of species. In human primates, these affective sounds span a repertoire of environmental and human sounds when we vocalize or produce music. In terms of neural processing, cortical and subcortical brain areas constitute a distributed network that supports our listening experience to these affective sounds. Taking an exhaustive cross-domain view, we accordingly suggest… CONTINUE READING
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