The social role of touch in humans and primates: Behavioural function and neurobiological mechanisms

@article{Dunbar2010TheSR,
  title={The social role of touch in humans and primates: Behavioural function and neurobiological mechanisms},
  author={R. Dunbar},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2010},
  volume={34},
  pages={260-268}
}
  • R. Dunbar
  • Published 2010
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
Grooming is a widespread activity throughout the animal kingdom, but in primates (including humans) social grooming, or allo-grooming (the grooming of others), plays a particularly important role in social bonding which, in turn, has a major impact on an individual's lifetime reproductive fitness. New evidence from comparative brain analyses suggests that primates have social relationships of a qualitatively different kind to those found in other animal species, and I suggest that, in primates… Expand
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