The social organization of adult blue tangs, Acanthurus coeruleus, on a fringing reef, Barbados, West Indies

@article{Morgan2004TheSO,
  title={The social organization of adult blue tangs, Acanthurus coeruleus, on a fringing reef, Barbados, West Indies},
  author={Ingrid E. Morgan and Donald L. Kramer},
  journal={Environmental Biology of Fishes},
  year={2004},
  volume={71},
  pages={261-273}
}
  • I. Morgan, D. Kramer
  • Published 1 November 2004
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Biology of Fishes
Blue tangs in Barbados exhibit three distinct social modes: territorial, schooling and wandering. We compared the mobility, foraging, aggression performed and received and the use of cleaning stations of adult blue tangs among modes and among habitats within a single fringing reef in Barbados. Evidence from observed switches during focal observations and multiple observations of tagged individuals indicate that fish are either territorial or non-territorial. Non-territorial fish formed schools… 
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