The social construction of race: biracial identity and vulnerability to stereotypes.

Abstract

Multiracial individuals are more likely to have a heightened awareness of race as a social construct than monoracial individuals. This article examines the impact that a heightened awareness of race as a social construct has on the relationship between racial stereotypes and performance. Study 1 finds that multiracial individuals reported subscribing less to the notion that race biologically determines ability. Study 2 finds that monoracial individuals show stereotype activation, whereas multiracial individuals show stereotype inhibition in reaction to race salience. Study 3 draws on the work on stereotypes and performance to test the susceptibility of multiracial individuals to racial stereotypes about ability. The authors find that Asian/White and Black/White multiracial individuals were less susceptible to racial stereotypes than monoracial individuals. Whereas monoracial participants showed significant performance changes in reaction to race salience, multiracial individuals did not. Study 4 finds that emphasizing the social construction of race buffers individuals from stereotype threat effects.

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Cite this paper

@article{Shih2007TheSC, title={The social construction of race: biracial identity and vulnerability to stereotypes.}, author={Margaret J. Shih and Courtney M Bonam and Diana T. Sanchez and Courtney M Peck}, journal={Cultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology}, year={2007}, volume={13 2}, pages={125-33} }