The social brain hypothesis

@article{Dunbar1998TheSB,
  title={The social brain hypothesis},
  author={Robin I. M. Dunbar},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={1998},
  volume={6}
}
Conventional wisdom over the past 160 years in the cognitive and neurosciences has assumed that brains evolved to process factual information about the world. Most attention has therefore been focused on such features as pattern recognition, color vision, and speech perception. By extension, it was assumed that brains evolved to deal with essentially ecological problem‐solving tasks. © 1998 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. 
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