The snooze of lose: Rapid reaching reveals that losses are processed more slowly than gains.

@article{Chapman2015TheSO,
  title={The snooze of lose: Rapid reaching reveals that losses are processed more slowly than gains.},
  author={Craig S. Chapman and Jason P. Gallivan and Jeremy D Wong and Nathan J. Wispinski and James T. Enns},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. General},
  year={2015},
  volume={144 4},
  pages={
          844-63
        }
}
Decision making revolves around weighing potential gains and losses. Research in economic decision making has emphasized that humans exercise disproportionate caution when making explicit choices involving loss. By comparison, research in perceptual decision making has revealed a processing advantage for targets associated with potential gain, though the effects of loss have been explored less systematically. Here, we use a rapid reaching task to measure the relative sensitivity (Experiment 1… 

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