The smallest known non-avian theropod dinosaur

@article{Xu2000TheSK,
  title={The smallest known non-avian theropod dinosaur},
  author={Xing Xu and Zhonghe Zhou and Xiaolin Wang},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2000},
  volume={408},
  pages={705-708}
}
Non-avian dinosaurs are mostly medium to large-sized animals, and to date all known mature specimens are larger than the most primitive bird, Archaeopteryx. Here we report on a new dromaeosaurid dinosaur, Microraptor zhaoianus gen. et sp. nov., from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Liaoning, China. This is the first mature non-avian dinosaur to be found that is smaller than Archaeopteryx, and it eliminates the size disparity between the earliest birds and their closest non-avian… 

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