The skin barrier as an innate immune element

@article{Elias2007TheSB,
  title={The skin barrier as an innate immune element},
  author={Peter M. Elias},
  journal={Seminars in Immunopathology},
  year={2007},
  volume={29},
  pages={3-14}
}
  • P. Elias
  • Published 30 March 2007
  • Biology
  • Seminars in Immunopathology
Since life in a terrestrial environment threatens mammals continuously with desiccation, the structural, cellular, biochemical, and regulatory mechanisms that sustain permeability barrier homeostasis have justifiably comprised a major thrust of prior and recent research on epidermal barrier function. Yet, the epidermis mediates a broad set of protective ‘barrier’ functions that includes defense against pathogen challenges. Permeability and antimicrobial function are both co-regulated and… 

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