The skin: an indispensable barrier

@article{Proksch2008TheSA,
  title={The skin: an indispensable barrier},
  author={Ehrhardt Proksch and Johanna M. Brandner and J. M. Jensen},
  journal={Experimental Dermatology},
  year={2008},
  volume={17}
}
Abstract:  The skin forms an effective barrier between the organism and the environment preventing invasion of pathogens and fending off chemical and physical assaults, as well as the unregulated loss of water and solutes. In this review we provide an overview of several components of the physical barrier, explaining how barrier function is regulated and altered in dermatoses. The physical barrier is mainly localized in the stratum corneum (SC) and consists of protein‐enriched cells… 
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  • Biology
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  • 2014
TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
An overview of the wide range of biological functions of mammalian epidermal lipids is given, including those involved in the active protection of the body from external insults, and the signaling events that modulate the immune responses to environmental stress.
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