The size of the largest marsupial and why it matters

@article{Wroe2004TheSO,
  title={The size of the largest marsupial and why it matters},
  author={S. Wroe and M. Crowther and J. Dortch and John Chong},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={271},
  pages={S34 - S36}
}
  • S. Wroe, M. Crowther, +1 author John Chong
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
We show that at 2786 kg, the largest known marsupial, Diprotodon optatum, was much larger than has previously been suggested. Our results contradict the conclusion that the maximum attainable body mass of an Australian marsupial has been constrained by low productivity. 
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