The singular value decomposition for polynomial systems

@inproceedings{Corless1995TheSV,
  title={The singular value decomposition for polynomial systems},
  author={Robert M Corless and Patrizia M. Gianni and Barry M. Trager and Stephen M. Watt},
  booktitle={ISSAC '95},
  year={1995}
}
This paper introduces singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithms for some standard polynomial computations, in the case where the coecients are inexact or imperfectly known. We first give an algorithm for computing univariate GCD’s which gives exact results for interesting nearby problems, and give ecient algorithms for computing precisely how nearby. We generalize this to multivariate GCD computation. Next, we adapt Lazard’s u-resultant algorithm for the solution of overdetermined systems… 

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