The short-form version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21): construct validity and normative data in a large non-clinical sample.

@article{Henry2005TheSV,
  title={The short-form version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21): construct validity and normative data in a large non-clinical sample.},
  author={Julie D. Henry and John R. Crawford},
  journal={The British journal of clinical psychology},
  year={2005},
  volume={44 Pt 2},
  pages={
          227-39
        }
}
OBJECTIVES To test the construct validity of the short-form version of the Depression anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21), and in particular, to assess whether stress as indexed by this measure is synonymous with negative affectivity (NA) or whether it represents a related, but distinct, construct. To provide normative data for the general adult population. DESIGN Cross-sectional, correlational and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). METHODS The DASS-21 was administered to a non-clinical… 

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