The semantic categories of cutting and breaking events: A crosslinguistic perspective

@inproceedings{Majid2007TheSC,
  title={The semantic categories of cutting and breaking events: A crosslinguistic perspective},
  author={Asifa Majid and Melissa Bowerman and Miriam van Staden and James S. Boster},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract This special issue of Cognitive Linguistics explores the linguistic encoding of events of cutting and breaking. In this article we first introduce the project on which it is based by motivating the selection of this conceptual domain, presenting the methods of data collection used by all the investigators, and characterizing the language sample. We then present a new approach to examining crosslinguistic similarities and differences in semantic categorization. Applying statistical… Expand
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How similar are semantic categories in closely related languages? A comparison of cutting and breaking in four Germanic languages
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Using this technique, it is found that there are surprising differences among the languages in the number of categories, their exact boundaries, and the relationship of the terms to one another—all of which is circumscribed by a common semantic space. Expand
Applying language typology:Practical applications of research on typological contrasts between languages
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How similar are semantic categories in closely related languages? A comparison of cutting and breaking in four Germanic languages
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Using this technique, it is found that there are surprising differences among the languages in the number of categories, their exact boundaries, and the relationship of the terms to one another—all of which is circumscribed by a common semantic space. Expand
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Abstract Mandarin categorizes cutting and breaking events on the basis of fine semantic distinctions in the causal action and the caused result. I demonstrate the semantics of Mandarin C&B verbs fromExpand
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