The self-domestication hypothesis: evolution of bonobo psychology is due to selection against aggression

@article{Hare2012TheSH,
  title={The self-domestication hypothesis: evolution of bonobo psychology is due to selection against aggression},
  author={B. Hare and Victoria Wobber and R. Wrangham},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2012},
  volume={83},
  pages={573-585}
}
Experiments indicate that selection against aggression in mammals can have multiple effects on their morphology, physiology, behaviour and psychology, and that these results resemble a syndrome of changes observed in domestic animals. We hypothesize that selection against aggression in some wild species can operate in a similar way. Here we consider the bonobo, Pan paniscus, as a candidate for having experienced this ‘self-domestication’ process. We first detail the changes typically seen in… Expand
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