The self and social cognition: the role of cortical midline structures and mirror neurons

@article{Uddin2007TheSA,
  title={The self and social cognition: the role of cortical midline structures and mirror neurons},
  author={Lucina Q. Uddin and Marco Iacoboni and Claudia Lange and Julian Paul Keenan},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={11},
  pages={153-157}
}

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