The scope of teleological thinking in preschool children

@article{Kelemen1999TheSO,
  title={The scope of teleological thinking in preschool children},
  author={D. Kelemen},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={1999},
  volume={70},
  pages={241-272}
}
  • D. Kelemen
  • Published 1999
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Cognition
These studies explore the scope of young children's teleological tendency to view entities as 'designed for purposes'. One view ('Selective Teleology') argues that teleology is an innate, basic mode of thinking that, throughout development, is selectively applied by children and adults to artifacts and biological properties. An alternative proposal ('Promiscuous Teleology') argues that teleological reasoning derives from children's knowledge of intentionality and is not restricted to any… Expand

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