The scientific history of hydrocephalus and its treatment

@article{Aschoff1999TheSH,
  title={The scientific history of hydrocephalus and its treatment},
  author={Alfred Aschoff and Paul Kremer and Bahram Hashemi and St. Kunze},
  journal={Neurosurgical Review},
  year={1999},
  volume={22},
  pages={67-93}
}
Summary Hydrocephalus cases were regularly described by Hippocrates, Galen, and early and medieval Arabian physicians, who believed that this disease was caused by an extracerebral accumulation of water. Operative procedures used in ancient times are neither proven by skull findings today nor clearly reported in the literature. Evacuation of superficial intracranial fluid in hydrocephalic children was first described in detail in the tenth century by Abulkassim Al Zahrawi. In 1744, LeCat… Expand
Hydrocephalus – History of Surgical Treatment over the centuries
TLDR
The treatment of hydrocephalus, over the centuries, underwent three stages of evolution: prior to the late 19th century, treatment for “water on the brain” involved more observation than intervention; medical treatment was useless; surgery was hopeless; and the combined invention of artificial valves and silicone led to a worldwide therapeutic breakthrough. Expand
Hydrocephalus According to Byzantine Writers
TLDR
The ideas of the Byzantine physicians were based on the ancient Hippocratic, Hellenistic, and Roman traditions, which influenced Arab medicine and then Western European medicine, thus constituting significant roots of modern neurosurgery. Expand
A historical glimpse into treating childhood hydrocephalus
TLDR
The nineteenth century saw a giant leap in the understanding of hydrocephalus with many renowned physicians contributing to the topic and the symptoms associated with Hydrocephalus which was described by him as a disease that is difficult to diagnose and even more difficult to treat. Expand
Is there even such a thing as “Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus”?
TLDR
The concept of “normal pressure hydrocephalus” was invented by Hakim and Adams in 1965 to account for 3 patients they had seen who had been found to have communicating Hydrocephalus, with cerebrospinal fluid pressure at the very highest end of normal (180mm H2O). Expand
Post-Operative Complications of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt in Hydrocephalic Pediatric Patients-Nursing Care
TLDR
The ventricul operitoneal shunt complications in pediatrics are described and the role of nursing stuff is pointed out in the preve ntion of them and a proper nursing assessment includes valid identif ication of complications and their prompt treatment. Expand
First Treatment in Infants With Hydrocephalus: The Case for Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy/Choroid Plexus Cauterization.
TLDR
There are many reasons to be moving toward the adoption of neuroendoscopic treatment as the primary management for most infants with hydrocephalus, which will allow avoidance of the life-long morbidity that accompanies placement of a cerebrospinal fluid shunt in the infant brain. Expand
The antiquity of hydrocephalus: the first full palaeo-neuropathological description
TLDR
This case is presented as the so-far most compelling case of hydrocephalus backed by modern-day anthropological, radiological and molecular analyses conducted on the skeleton of an 18-month-old male infant deceased in 1831 and confirmed sex. Expand
Surgical scalpel used in the treatment of “infantile hydrocephalus” by Al Zahrawi (936–1013 a.d.)
TLDR
Al Zahrawi was the first medical author to provide illustrations of instruments used in surgery and wrote a total of 30-volume treatise on medicine in which he recommended decompression–trepanation for the treatment of hydrocephalus between the skull and brain tissue. Expand
Hydrocephalus and its management in Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.
TLDR
A short excerpt concerning hydrocephalus is presented from Avicenna's Canon, a large section of which was devoted to this topic in his principal medical book, the Canon of Medicine. Expand
Skull thickening, paranasal sinus expansion, and sella turcica shrinkage from chronic intracranial hypotension.
TLDR
New features of Sunken Eyes, Sagging Brain Syndrome are reported, which developed in a 29-year-old man with a history of VP shunt placement following a traumatic brain injury at the age of 9 years, and broaden the spectrum of clinical findings associated with low ICP. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 173 REFERENCES
Treatment of hydrocephalus: an historical and critical review of methods and results
  • J. Scarff
  • Medicine
  • Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
  • 1963
TLDR
Walter Dandy, almost single-handed, established the true pathology of hydrocephalus and developed sound physiological and surgical principles for its treatment and devised an extremely simple (dye) test which successfully serves this purpose. Expand
Long-term results in various treatments of hydrocephalus.
  • R. Jones
  • Medicine
  • Journal of neurosurgery
  • 1967
TLDR
Vcntriculo-atrial shunts were performed as a primary procedure on patients with hydrocephalus associated with myelomeningocele since the free flow of cerebrospinal fluid is usually impeded at several points. Expand
TREATMENT OF HYDROCEPHALUS: HISTORICAL REVIEW AND DESCRIPTION OF A NEW METHOD
TLDR
The present writer, from the beginning, must confess to a feeling of trepidation at offering still another method, and will at least review in some detail the multitudinous schemes presented—especially during the past forty years—for the cure of this distressing condition. Expand
POSTERO‐SUPERIOR THIRD VENTRICULOSTOMY (A NEW OPERATION METHOD FOR OCCLUSIVE HYDROCEPHALUS)
TLDR
3) Torkildsen’s operation being performed from the dangerous zone, ia safer and easier than the third ventriculostomy, however i t also has so e disadvantages. Expand
The Place of the Ventriculostomy Reservoir in the Treatment of Myelomeningoceles and Hydrocephalus
TLDR
Delays occur before a valve can be inserted into patients born with a hydrocephalus, as in these cases intraventricular haemorrhage secondary to moulding of the head during labour is not at all uncommon. Expand
AN EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDY OF INTERNAL HYDROCEPHALUS
TLDR
The present communication includes observations on dogs after the production of experimental hydrocephalus, together with observations on patients suffering from the disease, and considers the manner and the place of formation and of absorption of the normal cerebrospinal fluid. Expand
Complications Following Ventriculo-Cisternal Shunts
TLDR
Ventriculo-cisternostomy, introduced by Torkildsen in 1939, has been used as a final treatment in patients with nontumorous occlusive hydrocephalus and as a palliative operation in cases with surgically inaccessible deep-seated tumors producing occlusion of CSF pathways within the ventricular system. Expand
Hydrocephalus: overdrainage by ventricular shunts. A review and recommendations.
TLDR
The basic etiology, diagnosis, and variety of treatment modalities available are reviewed, including the need for shunt closing intracranial pressure control, and a hydrocephalus program designed to minimize theneed for long-term extracranial shunts and to maximize therapeutic intrac cranial procedures for hydrocephalu is designed. Expand
VENTRICULOSAGITTAL-SINUS SHUNT.
TLDR
A problem common to almost all shunts utilizing a foreign-body tube for the passage of cerebrospinal fluid has been obliteration or obstructation of its working ends, requiringience and perseverance on the par t of the pa t i en t and the surgeon and often te rminat ing in an unsuccessful result. Expand
Protection of the cortical mantle in premature infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus.
TLDR
The results of the placement of a subcutaneous ventricular reservoir in 12 low birth weight infants in an attempt to protect their cortical mantle until their medical problems resolve and the risks and complications of shunting are acceptable are reported. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...