The sad story of Vioxx, and what we should learn from it.

@article{Karha2004TheSS,
  title={The sad story of Vioxx, and what we should learn from it.},
  author={Juhana Karha and Eric J. Topol},
  journal={Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={71 12},
  pages={
          933-4, 936, 938-9
        }
}
  • J. Karha, E. Topol
  • Published 1 December 2004
  • Medicine
  • Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine
Rofecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is specific for cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2); it is therefore termed a COX-2 inhibitor, or coxib. To tell the story of how it came to be withdrawn, we must start in 1999 when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved it for the relief of arthritis symptoms. The approval was based on data from trials lasting 3 to 6 months and involving patients at low risk for cardiovascular illness. 

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