The rostral neurovascular system of Tyrannosaurus rex

@article{Bouabdellah2022TheRN,
  title={The rostral neurovascular system of Tyrannosaurus rex},
  author={Florian Bouabdellah and Emily J Lessner and Julien Benoit},
  journal={Palaeontologia Electronica},
  year={2022}
}
The study of the rostral neurovascular system using CT scanning has shed new light on phylogenetic and palaeobiological reconstructions of many extinct tetrapods. This research shows a detailed description of the rostral neurovascular canals of Tyrannosaurus rex including the nasal, maxillary (dorsal alveolar), and mandibular (ventral alveolar) canals. Extensive comparisons with published descriptions show that the pattern of these canals in Tyrannosaurus is not unusual for a non-avian theropod… 

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