The roots of human altruism.

@article{Warneken2009TheRO,
  title={The roots of human altruism.},
  author={Felix Warneken and Michael Tomasello},
  journal={British journal of psychology},
  year={2009},
  volume={100 Pt 3},
  pages={
          455-71
        }
}
Human infants as young as 14 to 18 months of age help others attain their goals, for example, by helping them to fetch out-of-reach objects or opening cabinets for them. They do this irrespective of any reward from adults (indeed external rewards undermine the tendency), and very likely with no concern for such things as reciprocation and reputation, which serve to maintain altruism in older children and adults. Humans' nearest primate relatives, chimpanzees, also help others instrumentally… 

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