The role of toxin A and toxin B in Clostridium difficile infection

@article{Kuehne2010TheRO,
  title={The role of toxin A and toxin B in Clostridium difficile infection},
  author={Sarah A. Kuehne and Stephen T. Cartman and John T. Heap and Michelle L. Kelly and Alan Cockayne and Nigel P. Minton},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={467},
  pages={711-713}
}
Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhoea in Europe and North America. During infection, C. difficile produces two key virulence determinants, toxin A and toxin B. Experiments with purified toxins have indicated that toxin A alone is able to evoke the symptoms of C. difficile infection, but toxin B is unable to do so unless it is mixed with toxin A or there is prior damage to the gut mucosa. However, a recent study indicated that toxin B is… Expand
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