The role of the subthalamic nucleus in response inhibition: Evidence from deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease

@article{Ray2009TheRO,
  title={The role of the subthalamic nucleus in response inhibition: Evidence from deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease},
  author={N. J. Ray and Ned Jenkinson and John-Stuart Brittain and Peter Holland and Carole Joint and Dipankar Nandi and Peter G. Bain and Nada Yousif and A. Green and J. S. Stein and Tipu Z. Aziz},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2009},
  volume={47},
  pages={2828-2834}
}
We measured reaction times during a stop-signal task while patients with Parkinson's disease were on and off unilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). While reaction times to a "go" stimulus improved, there was no change in reaction times to the "stop" stimulus (SSRTs). However, changes in SSRTs induced by DBS were highly dependent on baseline SSRTs (measured off stimulation), with the greatest improvements being achieved by those with particularly slow reaction… Expand
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TLDR
It is found that inhibitory control is improved only when both DBS are active, that is, the reaction time to the stop signal is significantly shorter in the DBS-ON condition than in all the others, and STN seems to play a selective role in response inhibition. Expand
Bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus has differential effects on reactive and proactive inhibition and conflict-induced slowing in Parkinson’s disease
TLDR
These results are the first demonstration, using a single task in the same patient sample, that DBS of the STN produces differential effects on reactive and proactive inhibition and on conflict resolution, suggesting that these effects are likely to be mediated through the impact of STN stimulation on different fronto-basal ganglia pathways: hyperdirect, direct and indirect. Expand
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The results provide direct support for the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus in response inhibition and suggest that this function may be mediated by a specific reduction in gamma oscillations in the cortico-subthalamic connection. Expand
Subthalamic nucleus stimulation influences expression and suppression of impulsive behaviour in Parkinson's disease.
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In Parkinson’s disease pallidal deep brain stimulation speeds up response initiation but has no effect on reactive inhibition
TLDR
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Response inhibition rapidly increases single-neuron responses in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's disease
TLDR
Electrophysiological evidence is provided for the hypothesized role of the STN in current models of response inhibition by using extracellular microelectrode recordings during deep brain stimulation surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease to study STN neurophysiological correlates of inhibitory control during a stop signal task. Expand
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TLDR
The data support the idea that beta activity in the STN is related to the inhibition of motor action and report that gamma oscillatory activity responds robustly to stop-signals as well as go-signALS. Expand
Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Alters the Cortical Profile of Response Inhibition in the Beta Frequency Band: A Scalp EEG Study in Parkinson's Disease
TLDR
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Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation induces impulsive action when patients with Parkinson’s disease act under speed pressure
TLDR
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Subthalamic nucleus activity dissociates proactive and reactive inhibition in patients with Parkinson's disease
TLDR
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