The role of the right temporoparietal junction in social interaction: how low-level computational processes contribute to meta-cognition.

@article{Decety2007TheRO,
  title={The role of the right temporoparietal junction in social interaction: how low-level computational processes contribute to meta-cognition.},
  author={Jean Decety and Claus Lamm},
  journal={The Neuroscientist : a review journal bringing neurobiology, neurology and psychiatry},
  year={2007},
  volume={13 6},
  pages={580-93}
}
Accumulating evidence from cognitive neuroscience indicates that the right inferior parietal cortex, at the junction with the posterior temporal cortex, plays a critical role in various aspects of social cognition such as theory of mind and empathy. With a quantitative meta-analysis of 70 functional neuroimaging studies, the authors demonstrate that this area is also engaged in lower-level (bottom-up) computational processes associated with the sense of agency and reorienting attention to… CONTINUE READING
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