The role of television in language acquisition.

@article{Rice1983TheRO,
  title={The role of television in language acquisition.},
  author={M. Rice},
  journal={Developmental Review},
  year={1983},
  volume={3},
  pages={211-224}
}
  • M. Rice
  • Published 1983
  • Psychology
  • Developmental Review
Abstract The conventional view among developmental psychologists is that television viewing does not contribute to a young viewer's language acquisition. That assumption is challenged. Evidence is presented that suggests that children can learn about language as they view television: (1) From age 2, children attend to television and view in an active, purposeful manner. (2) Some programs present dialogue in an attention-getting, content-redundant context. (3) Children can learn word meanings… Expand
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