The role of selection and gene flow in the evolution of sexual isolation in Timema walking sticks and other Orthopteroids

@inproceedings{Nosil2005TheRO,
  title={The role of selection and gene flow in the evolution of sexual isolation in Timema walking sticks and other Orthopteroids},
  author={Patrik Nosil},
  year={2005}
}
  • P. Nosil
  • Published 1 December 2005
  • Biology
Abstract The formation of new species involves the evolution of barriers to gene exchange. One such barrier is sexual isolation, where divergent mate preferences prevent copulation between taxa. Sexual isolation can evolve via a number of processes, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift, and reinforcing selection to avoid maladaptive hybridization. Conversely, gene flow between populations generally erodes the evolution of sexual isolation. In Timema cristinae walking… 
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