The role of reactive oxygen intermediates in nonspecific monocyte cytotoxicity induced by immune complexes.

Abstract

Normal human monocytes were induced to lyse nonsensitized target cells when triggered by precipitating immune complexes (IC) or soluble heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG). Catalase, azide, cyanide and three aminoacids employed as quenchers of ClO, significantly inhibited this nonspecific cytotoxicity (NSC), suggesting an important role for the myeloperoxidase (MPO) system. However, HO and/or 1O2 may also be involved in the lysis, since certain scavengers of these species such as mannitol, benzoate, ethanol and histidine, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), partially inhibited NSC. Moreover, cyanide and azide were unable to completely abrogate this lytic activity. When NSC was compared to antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), it was found that neither catalase nor oxygen-species scavengers affected ADCC while azide and cyanide significantly enhanced it. Antibody-coated target cells were also destroyed by IC-triggered monocytes. However, kinetic analysis and studies on the capacity of catalase to inhibit the lysis demonstrated that it was mediated through a NSC-like mechanism. The cytotoxic system described in this report offers a suitable model to study in vitro alternative lytic mechanisms triggered through monocyte receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (Fc gamma R).

Cite this paper

@article{Geffner1987TheRO, title={The role of reactive oxygen intermediates in nonspecific monocyte cytotoxicity induced by immune complexes.}, author={Jorge Ra{\'u}l Geffner and Mirta Nilda Giordano and Graciela Serebrinsky and Mart{\'i}n Amadeo Isturiz}, journal={Clinical and experimental immunology}, year={1987}, volume={67 3}, pages={646-54} }