The role of lin-22, a hairy/enhancer of split homolog, in patterning the peripheral nervous system of C. elegans.

@article{Wrischnik1997TheRO,
  title={The role of lin-22, a hairy/enhancer of split homolog, in patterning the peripheral nervous system of C. elegans.},
  author={Lisa A. Wrischnik and Cynthia J. Kenyon},
  journal={Development},
  year={1997},
  volume={124 15},
  pages={
          2875-88
        }
}
In C. elegans, six lateral epidermal stem cells, the seam cells V1-V6, are located in a row along the anterior-posterior (A/P) body axis. Anterior seam cells (V1-V4) undergo a fairly simple sequence of stem cell divisions and generate only epidermal cells. Posterior seam cells (V5 and V6) undergo a more complicated sequence of cell divisions that include additional rounds of stem cell proliferation and the production of neural as well as epidermal cells. In the wild type, activity of the gene… CONTINUE READING

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 31 CITATIONS

Neurogenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

  • WormBook : the online review of C. elegans biology
  • 2010
VIEW 4 EXCERPTS
CITES BACKGROUND
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

Hermaphrodite cell-fate specification.

  • WormBook : the online review of C. elegans biology
  • 2006
VIEW 6 EXCERPTS
CITES BACKGROUND
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

Conserved gene regulatory module specifies lateral neural borders across bilaterians.

  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2017
VIEW 1 EXCERPT
CITES BACKGROUND

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 88 REFERENCES

The Role of the lin-22 Gene in Patterning the C

L. A. Wrischnik
  • elegans Lateral Ectoderm. Ph. D. Thesis. University of California, San Francisco, California.
  • 1995
VIEW 6 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Caenorhabditis elegans by Drosophila Hox proteins

P. W. Ingham, S. M. Pinchin, K. R. Howard, D. Ish-Horowicz
  • Nature 377,
  • 1985
VIEW 17 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

A C

S. J. Salser, C. J. Kenyon
  • elegans Hox gene switches on, off, on and off again to regulate proliferation, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Development 122, 1651-1661.
  • 1996
VIEW 11 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Similar Papers