The role of learning in nocebo and placebo effects

@article{Colloca2008TheRO,
  title={The role of learning in nocebo and placebo effects},
  author={Luana Colloca and Monica Sigaudo and Fabrizio Benedetti},
  journal={PAIN},
  year={2008},
  volume={136},
  pages={211-218}
}
&NA; The nocebo effect consists in delivering verbal suggestions of negative outcomes so that the subject expects clinical worsening. Here we show that nocebo suggestions, in which expectation of pain increase is induced, are capable of producing both hyperalgesic and allodynic responses. By extending previous findings on the placebo effect, we investigated the role of learning in the nocebo effect by means of a conditioning procedure. To do this, verbal suggestions of pain increase were given… Expand
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