The role of glacier mice in the invertebrate colonisation of glacial surfaces: the moss balls of the Falljökull, Iceland

@article{Coulson2012TheRO,
  title={The role of glacier mice in the invertebrate colonisation of glacial surfaces: the moss balls of the Fallj{\"o}kull, Iceland},
  author={Stephen James Coulson and Nicholas G. Midgley},
  journal={Polar Biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={35},
  pages={1651-1658}
}
Glacier surfaces have a surprisingly complex ecology. Cryoconite holes contain diverse invertebrate communities, while other invertebrates, such as Collembola, often graze on algae and windblown dead organic material on the glacier surface. Glacier mice (ovoid unattached moss balls) occur on some glaciers worldwide. Studies of these glacier mice have concentrated on their occurrence and mode of formation. There are no reports of the invertebrate communities. But, such glacier mice may provide a… Expand

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