The role of genetic variation in the causation of mental illness: an evolution-informed framework

@article{Uher2009TheRO,
  title={The role of genetic variation in the causation of mental illness: an evolution-informed framework},
  author={Rudolf Uher},
  journal={Molecular Psychiatry},
  year={2009},
  volume={14},
  pages={1072-1082}
}
  • R. Uher
  • Published 1 December 2009
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Molecular Psychiatry
The apparently large genetic contribution to the aetiology of mental illness presents a formidable puzzle. Unlike common physical disorders, mental illness usually has an onset early in the reproductive age and is associated with substantial reproductive disadvantage. Therefore, genetic variants associated with vulnerability to mental illness should be under strong negative selection pressure and be eliminated from the genetic pool through natural selection. Still, mental disorders are common… 
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