The role of exercise therapy in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

@article{Long2010TheRO,
  title={The role of exercise therapy in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis},
  author={Amy R Long and Kelly A. Rouster-Stevens},
  journal={Current Opinion in Rheumatology},
  year={2010},
  volume={22},
  pages={213–217}
}
Purpose of reviewThe current review summarizes the existing knowledge about exercise therapy in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) along with activity level, functional abilities and exercise capacity of this population. Recent findingsCurrent studies show that children with JIA are considerably less active than their peers. They have significantly impaired aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity. The inactivity, decreased exercise capacity and disease course lead to… Expand
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