The role of corticotropin-releasing factor in depression and anxiety disorders.

@article{Arborelius1999TheRO,
  title={The role of corticotropin-releasing factor in depression and anxiety disorders.},
  author={Lotta Arborelius and Michael J. Owens and Paul M. Plotsky and Charles B. Nemeroff},
  journal={The Journal of endocrinology},
  year={1999},
  volume={160 1},
  pages={
          1-12
        }
}
Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a 41 amino acid-containing peptide, appears to mediate not only the endocrine but also the autonomic and behavioral responses to stress. Stress, in particular early-life stress such as childhood abuse and neglect, has been associated with a higher prevalence rate of affective and anxiety disorders in adulthood. In the present review, we describe the evidence suggesting that CRF is hypersecreted from hypothalamic as well as from extrahypothalamic neurons in… 

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