The role of attribution of motivation in producing postsuppressional rebound.

Abstract

Three studies demonstrated that postsuppressional rebound (PSR) may be both reduced and enhanced by manipulating people's attributions about why they experience difficulty during suppression. Telling participants that suppression failures indicate a high motivation to use the suppressed construct produced more PSR than telling them that suppression failures indicate a low motivation to use the construct (Study 1). Telling participants that an external stimulus would make suppression easy produced more PSR than telling them that it would make suppression difficult (Study 2). Telling participants that suppressing a stereotype is difficult and unindicative of prejudice eliminated PSR (Study 3). These results support the notion that PSR occurs because people infer from the difficulty experienced during suppression and from suppression failures that they are motivated to use the suppressed construct.

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Cite this paper

@article{Foerster2001TheRO, title={The role of attribution of motivation in producing postsuppressional rebound.}, author={Jakob Foerster and Nira Liberman}, journal={Journal of personality and social psychology}, year={2001}, volume={81 3}, pages={377-90} }