The role of aspirin dose on the prevention of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction: systematic review and meta‐analysis

@article{Roberge2017TheRO,
  title={The role of aspirin dose on the prevention of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction: systematic review and meta‐analysis},
  author={St{\'e}phanie Roberge and Kypros H. Nicolaides and Suzanne Demers and Jon Hyett and Nils Chaillet and Emmanuel Bujold},
  journal={American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology},
  year={2017},
  volume={216},
  pages={110–120.e6}
}
BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction are major causes of perinatal death and handicap in survivors. Randomized clinical trials have reported that the risk of preeclampsia, severe preeclampsia, and fetal growth restriction can be reduced by the prophylactic use of aspirin in high‐risk women, but the appropriate dose of the drug to achieve this objective is not certain. OBJECTIVE: We sought to estimate the impact of aspirin dosage on the prevention of preeclampsia, severe… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
Preeclampsia (PE) is a morbid and potentially lethal complication of pregnancy and is more common in women with specific risk factors. Aspirin (ASA) is currently the only prophylactic… Expand
ConditionsPreeclampsia
InterventionDrug
Interventional Clinical Trial
According to U.S. Pharmacist® "low-dose aspirin refers to dosages between 81 mg and 325 mg taken every day to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and colon cancer." It has been found… Expand
ConditionsPreeclampsia
InterventionDrug
Aspirin for the prevention of preterm and term preeclampsia: systematic review and metaanalysis
TLDR
Aspirin reduces the risk of preterm preeclampsia, but not term preeclampedia, and only when it is initiated at ≤16 weeks of gestation and at a daily dose of ≥100 mg. Expand
Does low-dose aspirin initiated before 11 weeks' gestation reduce the rate of preeclampsia?
TLDR
The administration of low-dose aspirin at <11 weeks' gestation in high risk women does not decrease the risk of preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, any hypertensive disorder of pregnancy and fetal growth restriction, but it might reduce therisk of preterm delivery. Expand
The effect of aspirin on preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction and preterm delivery among healthy pregnancies with a history of preeclampsia
TLDR
The findings of the present study conducted exclusively on women with previous documented PE revealed that taking aspirin may have a preventive effect on PE in the current pregnancy. Expand
Dose of aspirin to prevent preterm preeclampsia in women with moderate or high-risk factors: A systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
This meta-analysis is limited due to the deficiency of homogeneous high evidence data available in the literature to date; however, it may be prudent for clinicians to consider that the optimal aspirin dose may be higher than the current guidelines advise. Expand
Aspirin Prophylaxis During Pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
TLDR
Initiation of low-dose aspirin administration before 20 weeks of gestation considerably decreases the incidence of pre-eclampsia and related neonatal outcomes without increasing bleeding risk. Expand
Aspirin for prevention of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction
TLDR
The appropriate timing and dose of aspirin should be started before 16 weeks of pregnancy and at a daily dose of 100 mg or more, and further studies are needed to improve the identification of patients likely to benefit from prophylactic aspirin. Expand
Low-dose aspirin at ≤16 weeks of gestation for preventing preeclampsia and its maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
It is demonstrated that, compared with placebo or no treatment, low-dose aspirin was associated with a significant reduction in the overall risk ratio of preeclampsia regardless of the time to delivery, and except for postpartum hemorrhage,Low- dose aspirin also significantly reduced the risk of maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes. Expand
The role of aspirin, heparin, and other interventions in the prevention and treatment of fetal growth restriction.
TLDR
It is confirmed that aspirin modestly reduces small-for-gestational-age pregnancy in women at high risk and that a dose of ≥100 mg should be recommended and to start at or before 16 weeks of gestation, and that low-molecular-weight heparin should remain in the research setting. Expand
Meta‐analysis on the effect of aspirin use for prevention of preeclampsia on placental abruption and antepartum hemorrhage
TLDR
Aspirin at a daily dose of ≥100 mg for prevention of preeclampsia that is initiated at ≤16 weeks of gestation, rather than >16 weeks, may decrease the risk of placental abruption or antepartum hemorrhage. Expand
The Effect of Aspirin on Preeclampsia: A Systematic Review
TLDR
Aspirin (within the lowest daily dose of 75mg) has a positive effect on the prevention of preeclampsia (pregnant women at risk of preeClampsia) among most of the studies and positive results. Expand
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