The role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of intestinal barrier dysfunction after hemorrhagic shock.

@article{Raman2006TheRO,
  title={The role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of intestinal barrier dysfunction after hemorrhagic shock.},
  author={Kathleen G. Raman and Penny Lynn Sappington and Runkuan Yang and Ryan M. Levy and Jose M. Prince and Shiguang Liu and Simon Watkins and Ann Marie Schmidt and Timothy R. Billiar and Mitchell P. Fink},
  journal={American journal of physiology. Gastrointestinal and liver physiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={291 4},
  pages={
          G556-65
        }
}
The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous conditions associated with excessive inflammation. To determine whether RAGE-dependent signaling is important in the development of intestinal barrier dysfunction after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HS/R), C57Bl/6, rage(-/-), or congenic rage(+/+) mice were subjected to HS/R (mean arterial pressure of 25 mmHg for 3 h) or a sham procedure. Twenty-four hours later, bacterial… 

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