The river : a journey back to the source of HIV and AIDS

@article{Hooper2002TheR,
  title={The river : a journey back to the source of HIV and AIDS},
  author={Edward Hooper},
  journal={Health and History},
  year={2002},
  volume={4},
  pages={127}
}
  • E. Hooper
  • Published 2002
  • Medicine
  • Health and History
Examines the possible source of HIV, analyzing a number of theories concerning its origins and investigating current scientific inquiries into HIV, AIDS, and the search for a cure. 
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AIDS was first identified in Sub-Saharan Africa and North America in the early 1980s, however, HIV-1 has diffused much more rapidly in the former continent than in latter, because the virus cannot diffuse well in local populations that have an adequate dietary intake of selenium.
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