The risk of venous and arterial thrombosis in hyperhomocysteinaemia is low and mainly depends on concomitant thrombophilic defects.

@article{Lijfering2007TheRO,
  title={The risk of venous and arterial thrombosis in hyperhomocysteinaemia is low and mainly depends on concomitant thrombophilic defects.},
  author={Willem M. Lijfering and Michiel Coppens and Marl{\`e}ne H W van de Poel and Saskia Middeldorp and Karly Hamul{\'y}ak and Ivan Bank and Nic J. G. M. Veeger and Martin H. Prins and Harry Roger B{\"u}ller and Jan van der Meer},
  journal={Thrombosis and haemostasis},
  year={2007},
  volume={98 2},
  pages={457-63}
}
As homocysteine-lowering treatment has not reduced the risk of recurrent thrombosis in recent clinical trials, we hypothesized that mild hyperhomocysteinaemia is an epiphenomenon or associated with a low absolute risk of thrombosis. In this retrospective study, we enrolled 478 evaluable first-degree relatives of consecutive patients with venous thrombosis… CONTINUE READING