The risk of switch to mania in patients with bipolar disorder during treatment with an antidepressant alone and in combination with a mood stabilizer.

@article{Viktorin2014TheRO,
  title={The risk of switch to mania in patients with bipolar disorder during treatment with an antidepressant alone and in combination with a mood stabilizer.},
  author={Alexander Viktorin and Paul Lichtenstein and Michael E. Thase and Henrik Larsson and Cecilia Lundholm and Patrik K. E. Magnusson and Mikael Land{\'e}n},
  journal={The American journal of psychiatry},
  year={2014},
  volume={171 10},
  pages={
          1067-73
        }
}
OBJECTIVE This study examined the risk of antidepressant-induced manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder treated either with antidepressant monotherapy or with an antidepressant in conjunction with a mood stabilizer. METHOD Using Swedish national registries, the authors identified 3,240 patients with bipolar disorder who started treatment with an antidepressant and had no antidepressant treatment during the previous year. Patients were categorized into those receiving antidepressant… Expand
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