The rise of fire: Fossil charcoal in late Devonian marine shales as an indicator of expanding terrestrial ecosystems, fire, and atmospheric change

@article{Rimmer2015TheRO,
  title={The rise of fire: Fossil charcoal in late Devonian marine shales as an indicator of expanding terrestrial ecosystems, fire, and atmospheric change},
  author={S. Rimmer and Sarah J. Hawkins and A. Scott and Walter L. Cressler},
  journal={American Journal of Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={315},
  pages={713 - 733}
}
  • S. Rimmer, Sarah J. Hawkins, +1 author Walter L. Cressler
  • Published 2015
  • Geology
  • American Journal of Science
  • Fossil charcoal provides direct evidence for fire events that, in turn, have implications for the evolution of both terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Most of the ancient charcoal record is known from terrestrial or nearshore environments and indicates the earliest occurrences of fire in the Late Silurian. However, despite the rise in available fuel through the Devonian as vascular land plants became larger and trees and forests evolved, charcoal occurrences are very sparse until the… CONTINUE READING

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