The rise and rise of complementary and alternative medicine: a sociological perspective

@article{Coulter2004TheRA,
  title={The rise and rise of complementary and alternative medicine: a sociological perspective},
  author={Ian Coulter and Evan Willis},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={2004},
  volume={180}
}
Major reasons for the growth in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), in Australia and elsewhere, are general societal changes rather than specific reasons internal to medicine. There are problems of definition of CAM, as well as the extent to which CAM modalities can be considered a unified paradigm. The general changes examined include the consumer and green movements, as well as postmodernism. The movement surrounding evidence‐based healthcare may provide some answers, but… Expand
The future of traditional medicine
With the increasing demand for various forms of traditional medicine, here considered under the umbrella term of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), to be available as part of mainstreamExpand
Toward a sociological understanding of complementary and alternative medicine use.
TLDR
Current and potential sociological approaches to understanding CAM use, and the importance of social forces that influence persons' decisions to utilize (or not) "unconventional" medical care are illustrated. Expand
Social sources of disparities in use of complementary and alternative medicine
TLDR
The major focus of this chapter will be a review of the literature on social factors and use of CAM, looking at such factors as age, gender, socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity and immigration status, and health status. Expand
Complementary and alternative health care in Israel
TLDR
The data are drawn from over ten years of sociological research on CAM in Israel, which included observation, survey research, and over one hundred in-depth interviews with a variety of CAM practitioners and policy makers in the major medical institutions. Expand
Complementary and alternative medicine: where's the evidence?
TLDR
This article considers the ongoing debate regarding the role of complementary and alternative medicine in a modern maternity setting and how the effectiveness of therapies should be assessed. Expand
The Rising Popularity of Complementary Medicine: Perspectives from the Field
TLDR
The focus of this study is to give a voice to a small group of professionals who have contributed to the development of the natural therapies‘ profession in Australia. Expand
(Using) complementary and alternative medicine: the perceptions of palliative patients with cancer.
TLDR
Despite increased legitimation and medicalization of CAM, patients assess CAM differently to allopathic medicine, with different (positive and negative) assessments attributable to users. Expand
Complementary and alternative medicine — with a difference
The Medical Journal of Australia ISSN: 0025-729X 7 June 2004 180 11 585-586 ©The Medical Journal of Australia 2004 www.mja.com.au Complementary and alternative medicine Human Genome Project is aExpand
Complementary and alternative medicine use among diabetic patients in Africa: a Kenyan perspective
TLDR
The pattern of CAM use in Kenya is explored, some constraints to proper CAM control are identified, and suggestions on what can be done to ensure safe and regulated CAM use are offered. Expand
Two into One Won’t Go: Conceptual, Clinical, Ethical and Legal Impedimenta to the Convergence of CAM and Orthodox Medicine
TLDR
Against the background of the reasons for the increasing utilisation of CAM by the public and by general practitioners, TI-convergence is supported and MP-conversgence is rejected. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES
Why are Australian GPs using alternative medicine?
This paper examines a comprehensive, sociological explanation of the increasing recognition and use of alternative therapies-such as acupuncture—by Australian GPs. Noting the 'pragmatic' motives ofExpand
Postmodern values, dissatisfaction with conventional medicine and popularity of alternative therapies
This article reviews three competing hypotheses that address the reasons people turn to alternative medicine. According to the medical outcome hypothesis, the reason is dissatisfaction with theExpand
Alternative medicine--the risks of untested and unregulated remedies.
TLDR
Alternative medicine (now often called complementary medicine) is a remarkably heterogeneous group of theories and practices — as disparate as homeopathy, therapeutic touch, imagery, and herbal medicine. Expand
Alternative or additional medicine? An exploratory study in general practice.
TLDR
Qualitative interviews with users suggested that rapid cures for chronic conditions were rarely expected; rather, an alternative explanation for health problems was sought and a greater sense of autonomy in dealing with them. Expand
Alternative medicine in the United States.
TLDR
The author's earlier classification of health professions into ancillary, limited, marginal, and quasi practitioners offers a fruitful set of categories for investigating relationships between these groups and organized medicine, and the movement of these groups from one status to another. Expand
Why patients use alternative medicine: results of a national study.
TLDR
Along with being more educated and reporting poorer health status, the majority of alternative medicine users appear to be doing so not so much as a result of being dissatisfied with conventional medicine but largely because they find these health care alternatives to be more congruent with their own values, beliefs, and philosophical orientations toward health and life. Expand
Complementary medicine: the need for audit
TLDR
A strategic approach to the development of complementary medical audit within the National Health Service is suggested to allow purchasers and practitioners of complementary medicine to determine the effectiveness and cost-benefits of these therapies, at the same time as improving standards of practice. Expand
Prevalence and cost of alternative medicine in Australia
TLDR
The rates of use and types of alternative medicine and therapists used by this population in 1993, and correlations with other demographic and medical variables are assessed, show women were more likely to consult naturopaths, iridiologists, and reflexologists than men. Expand
The escalating cost and prevalence of alternative medicine.
TLDR
The public appears to have ambivalent standards for alternative therapies but wishes to be empowered with accurate information to facilitate self-prescription, and expenditure on alternative therapies was nearly four times the public contribution to all pharmaceuticals. Expand
Integrating Complementary Medicine into Health Systems
This comprehensive and in-depth guide includes complete case studies by over 40 model organizations and thorough reviews of acupuncture, chiropractic, therapeutic massage, clinical nutrition, andExpand
...
1
2
3
...