The rice leaf blast pathogen undergoes developmental processes typical of root-infecting fungi

@article{Sesma2004TheRL,
  title={The rice leaf blast pathogen undergoes developmental processes typical of root-infecting fungi},
  author={A. Sesma and A. Osbourn},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={431},
  pages={582-586}
}
Pathogens have evolved different strategies to overcome the various barriers that they encounter during infection of their hosts. The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea causes one of the most damaging diseases of cultivated rice and has emerged as a paradigm system for investigation of foliar pathogenicity. This fungus undergoes a series of well-defined developmental steps during leaf infection, including the formation of elaborate penetration structures (appressoria). This process has been… Expand
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